CZ

Refugee Lives: Violence, Culture and Identity

Course Description:

This course examines the reasons for and outcomes of Arab refugee movements since WWII. How can people cope in an environment where they are cut off from everything familiar? What is the difference between a refugee, and internally displaced person and a migrant, between assimilation and integration? Art, literature and film will be considered as key texts for examining the ongoing experiences of refugees.

Advanced Chinese

Designed for Chinese as a foreign/second language. Follows Chinese204 or 224A as part of the language sequence. Increases students’ knowledge of more complex forms of the Chinese vocabulary system and competencies in speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing. Exposure to a speech variety appropriate to formal and informal speech situations. Materials drawn from newspaper articles, essays, and other readings concerning social and cultural issues in contemporary Chinese society. Emphasis on the active use of the language for communication in written and spoken forms.

Advanced Chinese II

Continuation of Chinese 305. Designed for Chinese as a foreign/second language. Builds knowledge of more sophisticated linguistic forms and learning to differentiate between different types of written and spoken discourse. Development of writing skills in selected formats and genres while continuing to develop correct use of speech patterns and vocabulary and cross-cultural understanding. Content drawn from newspaper articles, essays, and other readings concerning social and cultural issues in contemporary Chinese society. Prerequisite: Chinese 305 or equivalent.
 

Latino/a Voices in Duke, Durham, and Beyond

Course Overview:

This course explores the construction of Latinx identities and the formation of community voices by examining cultural, political and social issues at local and national levels. You will be asked to deepen your role in the community as an advocate, activist, and/or ally. You will be required to participate in a service-learning project for a minimum of 20 hours outside of class time. In this course you will be assessed on content knowledge, oral and written Spanish, and your community engagement.

Jewish Ethics

In this course, students will study the understanding of good, evil, and the moral life in Judaism, and acquire a familiarity with the general Jewish approach to ethics from antiquity to modern times.

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