What is a Duke service-learning course?

  • Students engage in a minimum of 20 hours of planned service activities.

  • The service experience is integrally related to the academic subject matter of the course.

  • Coursework involves critical reflection on the relationship between academic course content and the service experience.

  • Coursework involves critical reflection on the ethical and civic dimensions of the service experience.

Current and recently offered service-learning courses:

*For current course descriptions, please visit our semester page or search for the course in the schedule of classes

African and African American Studies

AAAS 236S: Civil/Human Rights Activism in Durham

Documentary fieldwork course exploring the legacy of civil and human rights activism in Durham through the life and work of noted historian, lawyer, poet, activist and priest Pauli Murray. 

Arabic

ARABIC 288: Conversational Egyptian Arabic

This course aims to develop speaking and reading proficiency level in conversational Egyptian Arabic within a cultural context including idiomatic expressions, social interaction, and understanding of customs, and holiday traditions. Students will visit local Arab/ Egyptian cultural associations, religious sites and families and develop profiles of local Egyptians and their journeys through interviews and discussion sessions.

Arts of the Moving Image

AMI 335S: Video for Social Change

Documentary film course focusing on the production of advocacy videos for social change.

Art, Art History, and Visual Studies

ARTHIST 390S: Nonprofit Cultural Institutions

This course provides an overview of how non-profit cultural institutions are formed and operate, looking at the operational structures and governance challenges. It also examines the origins of major cultural institutions in the U.S. and the current tax-exempt status framework.

ARTSVIS 390S: Building Creative Communities

This course explores how cultural bridges are created between migrant and local communities; in particular the ones build around youth and education (the so-called Dreamers and Duke Students). The course will incorporate a theoretical framework and a practical, hands-on experience on the topic of creative practices and community building.

ARTSVIS/VMS 212S: A Digital Approach to Documentary Photography

Documentary photography as a tool for exploring public education in Durham.

ARTSVIS 232S/VMS 224S: Small Town USA: Local Collaborations

Theory and practice of documentary photography in a small-town context

ARTSVIS/VMS 460S: Multimedia Documentary

Edit and shape fieldwork material into a Web-based multimedia presentation. Examine unique storytelling strategies for on-line presentations and compare this medium to traditional venues for documentary work such as exhibitions, books, and broadcast.

VMS 207S: Literacy through Photography

Children's self-expression and education through writing, photograph and documentary work.

VMS 211S: Children and the Experience of Illness

An exploration of how children cope with illness, incorporating the tools of documentary photography and writing

Asian & Middle Eastern Studies

AMES 219S: Civil Society and Civic Engagement in the Arab World

This course introduces students to realities of civil society and the mechanism of civic engagement in the Middle East and North Africa; explores assumptions on the role of civic engagement in promoting democracy; examines theoretical questions related to applying Western concepts of civic society in mostly majority Muslim countries. Students study modalities of society as well as Arab and Muslim writers conception of an ideal society and analyze civic engagement-oriented entities in the US in order to write and experiment with opportunities and challenges of furthering civic engagement in MENA. 

AMES 320S: Refugees' Lives: Violence, Culture, and Identity

This course examines how writers, artists and filmmakers represent the ways in which Palestinians, Syrians, Iraqis, Sudanese and Egyptians have become refugees and their adaptation strategies to new, harsh circumstances both in and outside the Arab world. It also discusses government and non-governmental organizations that have worked with Arab refugees since 1948 and explores the role played by refugees in constructing national identity and consciousness. Students will collect stories and histories of Arab refugees in Durham. 

Biomedical Engineering

BME 460L: Devices for People with Disabilities

Design of custom devices to aid disabled individuals. Students will be paired with health care professionals at local hospitals who will supervise the development of projects for specific clients. 

Chemistry

CHEM 180: Chemistry Outreach: Sharing Chemistry with the Community

Principles of chemistry outreach with emphasis on chemical demonstrations.

Civil & Environmental Engineering

CEE 315: Engineering Sustainable Design and the Global Community

Design and testing of solutions to complex interdisciplinary design products in a service learning context.

Classical Studies

CLST 342A: Archaeological Field School in Crete

Computer Science

COMPSCI 149S: Computer Science Education Research Seminar: Teaching with Robots

Project-based robotics course linked with community service. Designing and implementing the software and hardware architecture of a LEGO robot to perform tasks such as line tracking and simple map building.

COMPSCI 408S: Delivering Software: From Concept to Client

Development of software in teams that benefits a real-world client in the client's area of expertise.

Cultural Anthropology

CULANTH 235S: Human Rights Activism

Introduction to the foundations and development of the human rights movement. Explore themes related to mass violence and social conflict, U.S. foreign policy and international humanitarian law, and the challenges of justice and reconciliation around the world

CULANTH 236S: Farmworkers in NC: Poverty

Focus upon those who bring food to our tables, particularly those who labor in the fields of North Carolina and the Southeast.

CULANTH 246S: Civil/Human Rights Activism in Durham

Documentary fieldwork course exploring the legacy of civil and human rights activism in Durham through the life and work of noted historian, lawyer, poet, activist and priest Pauli Murray. 

CULANTH 397S: Language in Immigrant America

Discussion of issues of language in the context of immigration in the United States, from the turn of the 20th century until the present, combining approaches from literature, memoirs, language policy, media studies, and linguistic anthropology. Some fieldwork in an immigrant community. Topics include: identity, assimilation, race, bilingual communities, bilingual education, foreign accents, language contact.

Dance

DANCE 207S: Performance and Social Change

Based on the body of work of Brazilian theater director, writer, activist and legislator Augusto Boal. Examination of Boal's ideology and philosophy of "liberatory" theater and physical and vocal exploration of Boal's "arsenal" of theater techniques.

DANCE 290S-03: Performing Sexual Health

This course helps students gain expertise in sexual health issues, particularly HIV/AIDS and STI prevention, and then explore activist sexual health education theater as a way to communicate and share their learnings. The class will create, workshop, and finally perform a piece incorporating their learnings that will be taken into local high schools. 

Documentary Studies

DOCST 89S: Multimedia Documentary

A fieldwork and production course focused on the publication of interactive Web-based multimedia presentations, as pioneered by washingtonpost.com, nytimes.com, Magnum in Motion, and independent producers. Utilizing digital audio and photography, the class will work as a team to create a series of narrated slide shows around a common theme in a documentary style.

DOCST 153FS: US/Mexico Border

Focus on the border/frontera: a scar, a divide, a wall between friendly nations, a challenge for policy-makers, a line of demarcation for human rights abuses, a law enforcement nightmare, a pass-through for trade and NAFTA, a net for the poor. Know where you stand along this deadly line in the sand. Students will engage in a service-learning project related to immigrant laborers and will conduct this work in coordination with a local group such as Student Action with Farmworkers or El Centro Hispano.

DOCST 202S: Children and the Experience of Illness

An exploration of how children cope with illness, incorporating the tools of documentary photography and writing

DOCST 209S: A Digital Approach to Documentary Photography: Capturing Transience

Documentary photography as a tool for exploring public education in Durham.

DOCST 244S: Literacy through Photography

Children's self-expression and education through writing, photograph and documentary work.

DOCST 230S: Small Town USA: Local Collaborations

Theory and practice of documentary photography in a small-town context

DOCST 271S: Video for Social Change

Documentary film course focusing on the production of advocacy videos for social change. 

DOCST 290S: Nonprofit Cultural Institutions

This course provides an overview of how non-profit cultural institutions are formed and operate, looking at the operational structures and governance challenges. It also examines the origins of major cultural institutions in the U.S. and the current tax-exempt status framework.

DOCST 290S: Building Creative Communities

This course explores how cultural bridges are created between migrant and local communities; in particular the ones build around youth and education (the so-called Dreamers and Duke Students). The course will incorporate a theoretical framework and a practical, hands-on experience on the topic of creative practices and community building.

DOCST 290S: LGBTQ History and Activism: Duke, Durham, and Beyond

Designed as a learning community, the class will conduct oral histories, work with archival materials, engage community activists, and develop original research that gives voice to a largely ignored history of struggle and survival in the LGBTQ community. Students will learn how to conduct oral history interviews; research complex social histories; develop skills in storytelling; and wrestle with issues of representation and privacy.  In collaboration with community partners, students will work together to develop a final public humanities project that reflects what they have learned and supports the goals of the community partners.

DOCST 310S: The Short Audio Documentary

Introductory to intermediate audio techniques. Students will document the lives of children in East Durham, acting as mentors and helping the children to create audio pieces about their own lives. Students produce four short pieces (roughly three minutes long) in varying styles (journalistic, personal, artistic) for posting on iTunes and on public multimedia websites.

DOCST 317S: Veterans Oral History Project

Explore methods of oral history, specifically focusing on interviewing U.S. military veterans who have served during times of conflict.

DOCST 332S: Farmworkers in NC: Poverty

Focus upon those who bring food to our tables, particularly those who labor in the fields of North Carolina and the Southeast.

DOCST 341S: Politics of Food

Explores the food system through fieldwork, study, and guest lectures that include farmers, nutritionists, sustainable agriculture advocates, rural organizers, and farmworker activists. Examines how food is produced, seeks to identify and understand its workers and working conditions in fields and factories, and, using documentary research conducted in the field and other means, unpacks the major current issues in the food justice arena globally and locally. 

DOCST 347S: Civil/Human Rights Activism in Durham

Documentary fieldwork course exploring the legacy of civil and human rights activism in Durham through the life and work of noted historian, lawyer, poet, activist and priest Pauli Murray. 

DOCST 450S: Documentary Engagment through Field-Based Projects

Documentary photography as a tool for social engagement in preparation for intensive field-based projects.

DOCST 460S: Multimedia Documentary

Edit and shape fieldwork material into a Web-based multimedia presentation. Examine unique storytelling strategies for on-line presentations and compare this medium to traditional venues for documentary work such as exhibitions, books, and broadcast.

Economics

ECON 247S: Nonprofit Cultural Institutions

This course provides an overview of how non-profit cultural institutions are formed and operate, looking at the operational structures and governance challenges. It also examines the origins of major cultural institutions in the U.S. and the current tax-exempt status framework

ECON390: Social Inequalities and Low-Wage Work

Students in this course will participate in community economic development in Durham. First, students will learn to evaluate competing theories regarding the reasons for recent increases in social inequalities and low-wage work. Students will also gain new insights into local conditions of social inequalities and low-wage work through a service-learning component of the course, in which they will be partnered with a community group. Students will collaborate with community partners to determine and apply programs for improving the conditions of low-wage workers in Durham. The course will culminate in a poster session during which students will showcase the work they have done with their community partners.

Education

EDUC 101: Foundations of Education

Interdisciplinary examination of issues confronting American education, incorporating historical, political, economical, philosophical, and social perspectives. Exploration of ways cultural influences and differences have shaped public schools. 

EDUC 111FS: Pursuit of Equality: Rethinking Schools

Examination of ways schools may or may not perpetuate and reproduce social inequities. Focus on recent efforts to imagine and create socially-just schools. Discussion of our ethical responsibilities as civically engaged citizens to work towards educational equality and provide support of schools that are inclusive, culturally responsive, and democratic.

EDUC 149S: Computer Science Education Research Seminar: Teaching with Robots

Project-based robotics course linked with community service. Designing and implementing the software and hardware architecture of a LEGO robot to perform tasks such as line tracking and simple map building

EDUC 240: Educational Psychology

Principles of developmental, social, and cognitive psychology as applied to education, with a focus on how children learn. Examination of the impact on learning of race, class, gender, and ethnicity, including a comparative analysis of cultural differences in American schools.

EDUC 243S: Children, Schools, and Society

The processes by which children are educated in the United States. Ways children acquire through schooling social skills, moral values, and a sense of their role in society. Evaluation of the appropriateness of these goals for schooling, how schooling shapes children's development, and how the education policies that sanction these processes are formed. 

EDUC 244S: Literacy through Photography

Children's self-expression and education through writing, photograph and documentary work.

EDUCATION 290S: De/Re/Segregation in Education: A Case of Back to the Future?

This course traces the timeline of segregation, desegregation, and resegregation in education in the United States, from policies and practices first enacted in Colonial education through current policies and practices that challenge our nation’s commitment to equality of opportunity. 

EDUC 290S: Latina/o Educational Experiences

This course critically examines the educational experiences of Latina/os in the U.S., Using Latino literature, academic research, and media and popular culture texts this course deconstructs the socio-historical, cultural, and political issues impacting Latina/o communities.

EDUC 290S: Critical Studies in Education

Considering issues of the relationship between education and power, the politics of identity and identification, the social construction of knowledge, popular culture and the curriculum, and postmodernism's challenges to certainty, this course will take a multidisciplinary approach to the very purposes of education and schooling. We will consider institutions of education (both formal and informal) as sites of knowledge production and reproduction, as well as sites of resistance and transgression.

EDUC 307S: Issues of Education and Immigration

Community-based interaction with Durham Public Schools. Topics: Latino/a identity, access to education for immigrants, academic performance, assimilation, general pressures of family and peers, bilingualism, configurations of ethno-racial consciousness.

EDUC 321S: Infancy, Early Childhood, and Educational Programs

A comprehensive introduction to the field of early childhood education and child development from infancy to age eight. 

EDUC 363: Educational Leadership In and Beyond the Classroom

Introduction to study of culture, organization, and leadership in K-12 schools. Exploration of the history of leadership theories and practices and their application to current educational settings. Focus on moral dilemmas, ethical concepts, and general nature of ethical reasoning in varied school settings. Contrast the current focus on school reform through increased accountability, high stakes testing, and standards with the power of shared systems of norms, values, and traditions.

EDUC 366: Exceptional Learners: Policies & Practices

Provides a foundation of legal, social, educational, and psychological concepts focusing on understanding of exceptional learners. Explores social, cultural, and family context in which exceptional children live and learn.

EDUC 408S: Teaching Practices in Elementary Language Arts & Social Studies

Research-based teaching practices in elementary language arts and social studies for culturally diverse populations. Emphasis on literacy development across grade levels and content areas. Readings and field experience promoting critical analysis of ethical teaching practices, role of teachers and schools in society, and impact of teacher affect on environment and student learning.

Engineering and Engineering Management

EGR 261: Natural Catastrophes: Rebuiling from Ruins

Students will conduct a life cycle analysis of natural disasters.  Invited experts will discuss meteorologic, hydrologic and geologic factors that cause disasters; explore how societies plan and/or respond to the immediate and long-term physical, social, emotional and spiritual issues associated with survival; and present case studies of response, recovery and reconstruction efforts.

English

ENGLISH 396S: Language in Immigrant America

Discussion of issues of language in the context of immigration in the United States, from the turn of the 20th century until the present, combining approaches from literature, memoirs, language policy, media studies, and linguistic anthropology. Some fieldwork in an immigrant community. Topics include: identity, assimilation, race, bilingual communities, bilingual education, foreign accents, language contact.

Environmental Science and Policy

ENVIRONMENT 217: Urban Restoration Ecology

This course is part of the Duke Immerse "Environmental Justice" cluster, in which eight students from Duke and eight from Paul Quinn College in Dallas, TX will work together to confront issues of environmental injustice through the practices of restoration ecology and social entrepreneurship. Students will conduct research on cutting edge community involvement tools and apply what they learned to design and implement meaningful opportunities for community engagement. The Restoration Ecology course includes an overview of the discipline and the scientific, ethical, and philosophical underpinnings and legislative framework that guide much of the restoration work in the United States. Students will be involved in planning a restoration project for a stream and surrounding neighborhood in Dallas.

ENVIRON 218: Food and Energy

Examination of link between food and energy, both in science and culture. Includes food production, processing, transportation, consumption, and food security.

ENVIRON 245: Theory and Practice of Sustainability

Theories and practices of sustainability explored with application to the campus environment, including economic, social and environmental factors, and a local to global reach. The Duke campus is used as a case study to illustrate institutional practices including building design and operations, utility supply and consumption, carbon offsets design and calculation, transportation, water, sustainability education and communication, behavior change, waste production and recycling, and procurement.

ENVIRON 262: Natural Catastrophes: Rebuilding from Ruins

Students will conduct a life cycle analysis of natural disasters.  Invited experts will discuss meteorologic, hydrologic and geologic factors that cause disasters; explore how societies plan and/or respond to the immediate and long-term physical, social, emotional and spiritual issues associated with survival; and present case studies of response, recovery and reconstruction efforts.

ENVIRON 287A: Marine Conservation: Challenges at Sea

Introduction to marine conservation biology emphasizing community outreach at local middle schools. Material focuses on issues in marine conservation and how they are addressed. Lectures cover principles of conservation, biodiversity, extinction risks, genetic tools, fishery by-catch, over-exploitation, habitat degradation, invasive species, climate change, and marine protected areas.

ENVIRON 365: Engineering Sustainable Design and the Global Community

Design and testing of solutions to complex interdisciplinary design products in a service learning context.

ENVIRON 737: Environmental Education and Interpretation

Course will provide students with foundational knowledge and practical communication skills drawn from five schools of environmental education (EE): natural resource interpretation, science education, European approaches to EE, placed-based learning, and nature connectedness. Through readings, program observations, practicums, and instructor- and peer-based evaluations, students learn to evaluate their audience, develop measurable goals for communication, and refine their presentation skills. Students will also be able to adapt presentations and programs based on the five school of EE addressed in class. Students successfully completing course will become NAI Certified Interpretive Guides.

Ethics

ETHICS 290S: Medicine and Medical Ethics in the Abrahamic Traditions
 
What does medicine have to do with religion? This course explores the deep and rich history of the relationship between medicine, medical ethics, and the Abrahamic religious traditions, with an eye toward a more nuanced appreciation of our contemporarycontext. The course consists of three conceptual parts: a historical overview of the relationship between medicine and religion in the West, told largely through the story of a series of religiously inspired hospitals; an examination of current approaches to medical ethics within the Abrahamic religious traditions; and a series of case studies that will display the related but different approaches to medicine and medical ethics within Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will also explore how these concepts are put into practical service in the local community through partnerships with Durham agencies.
 
ETHICS 330: Ethics in the Hebrew Bible

An introduction to ethics in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, addressing moral and ethical dilemmas within the varied sources of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, the diversity of views and opinions within the text, and passages often regarded as problematic for modern readers.

ETHICS 341: Jewish Ethics

In this course, students will study the understanding of good, evil, and the moral life in Judaism, and acquire a familiarity with the general Jewish approach to ethics from antiquity to modern times.

ETHICS 301S: Business and Human Rights Advocacy Lab

An exploration of human rights advocacy from an ethical, political science and comparative perspective. The class will focus on issues related to business and human rights. A core component of the course will include a human rights "lab" in which students work in groups on policy-oriented projects in collaboration with international NGOs.

ETHICS 561: History of Poverty in the United States

A history of poverty and poverty policy in the United States from the colonial era to the present. The changing experience of poverty, efforts to analyze and measure poverty, and attempts to alleviate or eliminate it. Attention paid to the reasons for the durability of poverty in a wealthy nation and to the forces shaping the contours of anti-poverty policy.

French

FRENCH 325: Issues in Global Displacement: Voix Francophones

This course will build advanced language skills while exploring issues in global migration and resettlement. Through historical, political, and literary perspectives, it will explore the current state of refugees and asylum seekers in Western host societies, with a particular focus on Francophone refugees in North America. Service will include the following opportunties: volunteering during ESL classes, translating documents for ESL courses, working one on one with refugees on developing English language competencies, accompanying nursing students on home health visits, coordinating with volunteers from the medical center to arrange translation for refugee health interventions, offering home-school linkages for refugee families that include decoding school paperwork, and finally, developing a series of cultural activities designed to help integrate refugees into US culture - and more specifically, local culture in Durham. 

Global Health

GLHLTH 322S: End of Life in Russia and the US

Brief history of hospice movement in US and Russia. Examine key moments in end of life issues in each country; focus on social attitudes to death and dying and their effects on end of life care. Sources include memoirs, fiction, theoretical works, and policy documents.

GLHLTH 340: US Health Disparities

Teaches students about the trends, causes, and consequences of health disparities in the United States.

GLHLTH 373S: Global Health Service, Research, and Ethics

Introduces ethical and human rights concepts in Global Health and current issues in health ethics. Explores how to understand and engage in ethical health service, intervention, research and education.

GLHLTH 670S: Global Nutrition

Nutrition problems of developing countries. Strong focus on ethical and political issues relevant to formulation of nutrition policy and programs in developing countries.

Health, Wellness, and Physical Education

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 205: Health Effects of Exercise

Examines the physical and mental health benefits and risks of exercise from a participant and practitioner perspective. Students work in the community to promote physical activity.

History

HISTORY 109: Introduction to Human Rights and Social Movements

Explores the history of human rights and conceptions of human rights in different historical contexts. Considers a range of social movements, including environmental, civil rights, women's rights, and sexual liberation movements.

HISTORY 381S: Veterans Oral History Project

Explore methods of oral history, specifically focusing on interviewing U.S. military veterans who have served during times of conflict.

HISTORY 546: History of Poverty in the United States

A history of poverty and poverty policy in the United States from the colonial era to the present. The changing experience of poverty, efforts to analyze and measure poverty, and attempts to alleviate or eliminate it. Attention paid to the reasons for the durability of poverty in a wealthy nation and to the forces shaping the contours of anti-poverty policy.

Human Development

HUMANDEV 260: Psychosocial Aspects of Human Development

Biological, cultural, behavioral, and social arenas of human development throughout the human life span, with emphasis on the comparison of socially constructed age groups.  Examination of age groups in terms of their unique ethical values and challenges, as well as the social dilemmas caused by the extension of life expectancy.

Jewish Studies

JEWISHST 330: Ethics in the Hebrew Bible

An introduction to ethics in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, addressing moral and ethical dilemmas within the varied sources of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, the diversity of views and opinions within the text, and passages often regarded as problematic for modern readers.

JEWISHST 331: Ethics in the Hebrew Bible

An introduction to ethics in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, addressing moral and ethical dilemmas within the varied sources of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, the diversity of views and opinions within the text, and passages often regarded as problematic for modern readers.

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

LATAMER 390S: Building Creative Communities

This course explores how cultural bridges are created between migrant and local communities; in particular the ones build around youth and education (the so-called Dreamers and Duke Students). The course will incorporate a theoretical framework and a practical, hands-on experience on the topic of creative practices and community building.

Latino Studies in the Global South

LSGS 290S: Latina/o Educational Experiences

This course critically examines the educational experiences of Latina/os in the U.S., Using Latino literature, academic research, and media and popular culture texts this course deconstructs the socio-historical, cultural, and political issues impacting Latina/o communities.

LSGS 307S: Issues of Education and Immigration

Community-based interaction with Durham Public Schools. Topics: Latino/a identity, access to education for immigrants, academic performance, assimilation, general pressures of family and peers, bilingualism, configurations of ethno-racial consciousness.

LSGS 308S: Latino/a Voices in Duke, Durham, and Beyond

Construction of Latino/a identity(ies) and formation of community voices through the lens of cultural, political, and social issues at local and national level. Assessment on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish.

Linguistics

LINGUIST 396S: Language in Immigrant America

Discussion of issues of language in the context of immigration in the United States, from the turn of the 20th century until the present, combining approaches from literature, memoirs, language policy, media studies, and linguistic anthropology. Some fieldwork in an immigrant community. Topics include: identity, assimilation, race, bilingual communities, bilingual education, foreign accents, language contact.

Music

MUSIC 243: The Great American Musical

Broad-based examination of 20th-century musicals from origins in minstrel shows, to the evolution of the book musical comedies of the golden age of Broadway, to Hollywood movie musicals, and contemporary re-invention today. Lectures, screenings, and discussions will explore the musical from perspectives on its history, its fundamental generic characteristics, and its emphasis on assimilating ethnic, philosophic and religious differences into a community.

Political Science

POLISCI 380S: Human Rights Activism

Introduction to the foundations and development of the human rights movement. Explore themes related to mass violence and social conflict, U.S. foreign policy and international humanitarian law, and the challenges of justice and reconciliation around the world

Psychology & Neuroscience

PSY 236: Psychosocial Apsects of Human Development

Biological, cultural, behavioral, and social arenas of human development throughout the human life span, with emphasis on the comparison of socially constructed age groups.  Examination of age groups in terms of their unique ethical values and challenges, as well as the social dilemmas caused by the extension of life expectancy.

PSY 239: Adolescence

Adolescent development, including identity formation, intelligence, sexuality, peer and parent relationships, vocational choices, drugs, and psychopathology. Theory and empirical findings. Emphasis on the methods and research designs that have led to an understanding of adolescent development.

PSY 240: Educational Psychology

Principles of developmental, social, and cognitive psychology as applied to education, with a focus on how children learn. Examination of the impact on learning of race, class, gender, and ethnicity, including a comparative analysis of cultural differences in American schools

Public Policy Studies

PUBPOL 190FS: Leadership & Civic Engagement

The course explores ways that students can exercise enterprising leadership to address important civic issues within and external to Duke University. The pedagogy is experiential in that student teams develop practical initiatives that address real problems.

PUBPOL 211: Engineering Sustainable Design and the Global Community

Design and testing of solutions to complex interdisciplinary design products in a service learning context.

PUBPOL 230S: Human Rights Activism

Introduction to the foundations and development of the human rights movement. Explore themes related to mass violence and social conflict, U.S. foreign policy and international humanitarian law, and the challenges of justice and reconciliation around the world

PUBPOL 243S: Children, Schools, and Society

The processes by which children are educated in the United States. Ways children acquire through schooling social skills, moral values, and a sense of their role in society. Evaluation of the appropriateness of these goals for schooling, how schooling shapes children's development, and how the education policies that sanction these processes are formed. 

PUBPOL 263: Border Crossing: Leadership, Value Conflicts, and Public Life

Through case studies of religious and political groups in U.S., Europe, and Middle East with conflicting views about the role of religious faith in public life, explores leadership as the art of working productively with difficult value conflicts in groups, institutions, and social systems.

PUBPOL 265: Leadership Development and Organizations

The central goal of Leadership, Development, and Organizations is to provide students with relevant insights, knowledge, analytical competence, and skills important to exercising ethical, enterprising leadership in organizations and informal groups.

PUBPOL 266S: Whose Democracy? Participation & Public Policy in the US

Overview of patterns in Americans' engagement and disengagement from civic life. Examination of why people do (and do not) participation. Skews based on gender, race, ideology, and class differences. Role of American interest groups and social movements in policy change. Influence of public policies (e.g., federal tax laws, participation requirements, programs such as AmeriCorps) on civic and political participation.

PUBPOL 271S: Social Entrepreneurship in Action

Social Entrepreneurship in Action is a leadership course in applied social innovation. The course provides students with knowledge, analytical competence, and leadership skills important to becoming a changemaker.

PUBPOL 277: Natural Catastrophes: Rebuilding from Ruins

Students will conduct a life cycle analysis of natural disasters.  Invited experts will discuss meteorologic, hydrologic and geologic factors that cause disasters; explore how societies plan and/or respond to the immediate and long-term physical, social, emotional and spiritual issues associated with survival; and present case studies of response, recovery and reconstruction efforts.

PUBPOL 290S: Nonprofit Cultural Institutions

This course provides an overview of how non-profit cultural institutions are formed and operate, looking at the operational structures and governance challenges. It also examines the origins of major cultural institutions in the U.S. and the current tax-exempt status framework.

PUBPOL 375S: Video for Social Change

Documentary film course focusing on the production of advocacy videos for social change. 

PUBPOL 389S: Small Town USA: Local Collaborations

Theory and practice of documentary photography in a small-town context

PUBPOL 395S: Children and the Experience of Illness

An exploration of how children cope with illness, incorporating the tools of documentary photography and writing

PUBPOL 396S: Documentary Engagement

Documentary photography as a tool for social engagement in preparation for intensive field-based projects.

PUBPOL 528: History of Poverty in the United States

A history of poverty and poverty policy in the United States from the colonial era to the present. The changing experience of poverty, efforts to analyze and measure poverty, and attempts to alleviate or eliminate it. Attention paid to the reasons for the durability of poverty in a wealthy nation and to the forces shaping the contours of anti-poverty policy.

PUBPOL 563S: Making Social Policy

Examines the policymaking process, the role of different sectors in policymaking, policymakers' use of research and communicating with policymakers. Focus on social policy. 

Religion

RELIGION 89S: First Year Seminar: Jews and Germans 

This course will examine Jews and Jewish culture in Germany, from its origin during the late Roman Empire to the present day's remarkable--and controversial--rebirth.  Topics covered will include responses to the Crusades, the experience of the Enlightenment, the rise of Reform Judaism, the birth of "modern" culture during the Weimar period between the World Wars, the Holocaust/Shoah, and Jewish life in post-War Germany. The class will pay special attention throughout the course to the lives of "regular" people (Jews and Germans)--particularly women.  It will also explore cultures in the midst of crisis as well as at the peak of vibrancy, sometimes at the very same time. Students will have the opportunity connect their classroom experiences with the Durham community, whether through making archival material accessible, helping with recording Holocaust survivor accounts, or working with immigrant and refugee populations in the Triangle.

RELIGION 331: Ethics in the Hebrew Bible

An introduction to ethics in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, addressing moral and ethical dilemmas within the varied sources of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, the diversity of views and opinions within the text, and passages often regarded as problematic for modern readers.

RELIGION 341: Jewish Ethics

In this course, students will study the understanding of good, evil, and the moral life in Judaism, and acquire a familiarity with the general Jewish approach to ethics from antiquity to modern times.

RELIGION 280S: Religion and Peace
This course  clooks at places of religious conflict around the world. Students will work with local refugee populations who have fled from conflict situations as well as Kids 4 Peace, a nonprofit that brings chidren together from different religious backgrounds.
 

Russian

RUSSIAN 320S: End of Life in Russia and the US

Brief history of hospice movement in US and Russia. Examine key moments in end of life issues in each country; focus on social attitudes to death and dying and their effects on end of life care. Sources include memoirs, fiction, theoretical works, and policy documents.

RELIGION 331: Ethics in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament

Experience in the reading of the Hebrew Bible a sophisticated and nuanced understanding of the moral and ethical issues addressed by the biblical authors and how the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament serves as a resource for contemporary Jewish and Christian ethicists and policy makers, in an array of professions. 

Slavic & Eurasian Studies

SES 396S: Language in Immigrant America

Discussion of issues of language in the context of immigration in the United States, from the turn of the 20th century until the present, combining approaches from literature, memoirs, language policy, media studies, and linguistic anthropology. Some fieldwork in an immigrant community. Topics include: identity, assimilation, race, bilingual communities, bilingual education, foreign accents, language contact.

Sociology

SOCIOL 178FS: Refugees, Rights and Resettlement

35 million refugees and internally displaced persons in the world. A comparative historical overview of international refugee policy and law dealing with this growing population. Students will grapple with the ethical challenges posed by humanitarian intervention on behalf of refugees and the often unintended consequences of such policies. Students examine case studies to determine how different models for dealing with refugee resettlement affect the life chances of refugees.

SOCIOLOGY 250: Medical Sociologoy 

This course explores the interface between sociology and health-related issues, including analysis of macro, mezzo, and micro perspectives as they apply to health and illness. Examination of the social and cultural context in which health care in the United States is delivered, particularly in terms of racial and age disparities, as well as disparities in rural and urban healthcare settings. Students will primarily serve in health care facilities related to aging, death and dying.  Organizations will include the veterans hospital, local nursing homes, and hospice care facilities.

SOCIOL 260: Psychosocial Aspects of Human Development

Biological, cultural, behavioral, and social arenas of human development throughout the human life span, with emphasis on the comparison of socially constructed age groups.  Examination of age groups in terms of their unique ethical values and challenges, as well as the social dilemmas caused by the extension of life expectancy.

SOCIOL 262: Adulthood and Aging

Sociological and psychological persepctives on aging, from adolescence through old age and death; demography of human aging; social problems caused by increased longevity; policy issues.

SOCIOL 263: Aging and Health

Illness and health care utilization among the elderly, comparison to other populations, gender and race differences, medicare and medicaid, individual adjustment to aging and illness, social support for sick elderly, the decision to institutionalize, policy debate over euthanasia.

SOCIOL 264: Death and Dying

The biomedical, economic, social, and psychological issues surrounding death and dying in the twenty-first century in America. Religious and cultural perspectives both in the Judeo-Christian ethic and in other religious frameworks. Theories of dying from sociological and social psychological perspectives. 

SOCIOL 349: Sexuality and Society

Sociocultural factors affecting sexual behavior. Changing beliefs about sex; how sexual knowledge is socially learned and sexual identities formed; the relation between power and sex; control over sexual expression.

SOCIOLOGY 361: US Health Disparities  

Teaches students about the trends, causes, and consequences of health disparities in the United States.

SOCIOL 372: Food and Energy

Examination of link between food and energy, both in science and culture. Includes food production, processing, transportation, consumption, and food security.

SOCIOL 634S: Making Social Policy

Examines the policymaking process, the role of different sectors in policymaking, policymakers' use of research and communicating with policymakers. Focus on social policy.

Spanish

SPANISH 204: Advanced Intermediate Spanish

This course builds on the elements of the language acquired in Spanish 101 through 203. Further development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Expanding range and sophistication of grammar usage and vocabulary. Exposure to Spanish-speaking cultures. Work with comprehension and production of texts of greater extension and complexity. Prepares students for 300-level Spanish courses.

SPANISH 307S: Issues of Education and Immigration

Community-based interaction with Durham Public Schools. Topics: Latino/a identity, access to education for immigrants, academic performance, assimilation, general pressures of family and peers, bilingualism, configurations of ethno-racial consciousness.

SPANISH 308S: Latino/a Voices in Duke, Durham and Beyond

Construction of Latino/a identity(ies) and formation of community voices through the lens of cultural, political, and social issues at local and national level. Assessment on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish.

SPANISH 312: Community-Based Research with Spanish-Speakers 

This course partners with Duke faculty to assist them in implementing their research projects in the local Spanish-speaking community. As a service-learning course, students serve a minimum of 20 hours in tasks such as interpreters, survey takers, assisting in home visits, etc. as needed in the research study. Class session will explore topics related to the content of the research study such as education or health. In addition students will focus on research methods, cultural competency, and linguistic skills necessary to interact with the Latino/a community. 

SPANISH 313: Bridging Cultures: Latino Lives and Experiences in NC 

Exploration of key issues surrounding Latino communities in Durham and beyond, focusing on issues of culture and immigration, health, education, economy. 

Study of Sexualities

SXL 229: Sexuality and Society

Sociocultural factors affecting sexual behavior. Changing beliefs about sex; how sexual knowledge is socially learned and sexual identities formed; the relation between power and sex; control over sexual expression.

Theater Studies

THEATRST 204S: Performance and Social Change

Based on the body of work of Brazilian theater director, writer, activist and legislator Augusto Boal. Examination of Boal's ideology and philosophy of "liberatory" theater and physical and vocal exploration of Boal's "arsenal" of theater techniques.

THEATRST 210: The Great American Musical

Broad-based examination of 20th-century musicals from origins in minstrel shows, to the evolution of the book musical comedies of the golden age of Broadway, to Hollywood movie musicals, and contemporary re-invention today. Lectures, screenings, and discussions will explore the musical from perspectives on its history, its fundamental generic characteristics, and its emphasis on assimilating ethnic, philosophic and religious differences into a community.

THEATRST 310S: Nonprofit Cultural Institutions

This course provides an overview of how non-profit cultural institutions are formed and operate, looking at the operational structures and governance challenges. It also examines the origins of major cultural institutions in the U.S. and the current tax-exempt status framework

THEATER STUDIES 290-4: Stories for Social Change

This course takes as its centerpiece a story-building collaboration among Duke students and Durham community members that examines societal "visibility" and "invisibility" built by poverty, privilege, physical violence, and injustice. Students will engage in an expansive dialogue on race, class, and gender as unique yet interlinked social barriers to coalition building. Students will also investigate the ways in which personal narratives and storytelling advocate for social justice and reform. Course partnerships with North Carolina arts and service organizations such as Hidden Voices and the Durham Crisis Response Center and Duke-based offices such as the Women’s Center and the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity will allow students and community participants to craft, interrogate, and perform stories with the goal of creating social awareness and investigating policy change around the issues of sexual and domestic violence.

Writing

WRITING 101: Multilingualism in the US

Is the US becoming a bilingual or multilingual society? What factors encourage or discourage multilingualism? What would a multilingual society look like?

WRITING 101: Community History Writing

This class focuses on the idea that citizens, by writing publicly about their local past in print and online, play a vital and essential role in shaping discussions about their community's understanding of itself.

WRITING 101: Aid, Charity, and the Politics of Giving

This course combines the goals of cultural anthropology and service-learning as it examines different ways that people help others, including through acts of religious charity, philanthropy, and the professional work of humanitarianism. 

WRITING 101: Power & Poverty

In the richest nation in the history of the world, why do so many people continue to live in poverty?

WRITING 101: The Pet Connection

This course will explore both historic and current topics regarding pets from a wide variety of disciplines and perspectives. Readings will include a history of human-pet relationships, scientific studies on animal communication, articles on policy and legal issues, and articles examining therapeutic rehabilitation programs like "Puppies Behind Bars" and equine therapy for children with autism.

WRITING 101: From Woods to Words

Over 1,000 nature centers dot the American landscape, welcoming children and adults to national wildlands and local natural areas.  Yet, the goal of nature centers extends far beyond providing trail maps and refreshments. Nature centers also seek to inform, inspire, and even incite. What is the role of writing in environmental centers? What types of writing are used?

WRITING 101-57-59: Grassroots Activism

Instruction in the complexities of producing sophisticated academic argument, with attention to critical analysis and rhetorical practices.

















 




 








Recent Projects in Service-Learning Courses:

(More here!)

INJAZ hosts gathering for Arabic speaking refugees

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INJAZ, a group associated with Service-Learning's Community Based Language Initiative, consists of students in third and fourth-year Arabic courses who work with recently-arrived refugess in a cultural and language exchange experience. The group hosted a dinner for Sudanese and Iraqi refugees featuring musical performances and locally-made food. The night…
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"Kaleidoscope: Gender Still Matters" day brings equality in the spotlight

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Students in DOCST 347S Civil/Human Rights Activism in Durham: In the Spirit of Pauli Murray spent a day staging events around Duke and Durham focusing on feminism and other gender issues. Highlights were living sculptures and the trivia game "Feminist Feud!" Students also created and distributed postcards with information…
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Dance Performance Explores Community Stories

    • Performance for Social Change 1
In the Dance and Theater class “Performance and Social Change,” Duke students learn about theater techniques while telling the stories of the women at the Durham Crisis Response Center. For their final performance, the classes invited the community to join in their interactive theatrical event. DANCE 207S- Fall 2013…
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